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BHS_FOUNTAIN_CAREER RESEARCH: Citing Your Sources (APA)

Did You Know?

"APA" stands for American Psychological Association, and it is one of several accepted standard formats for giving credit to the sources you use for academic projects.  If you want to look up more rules for citing information in APA format, check out the excellent guide at Purdue University's Online Writing Lab (OWL).

Purdue OWL

The Online Writing Lab (OWL) from Purdue University is a great web-based resource about how to cite information in academic projects.  Use the menus on the left side of your screen to choose a topic you want to learn about (try looking at the topics "MLA In-text Citations: The Basics," "MLA Works Cited Page - Basic Format" and "MLA Sample Paper" )

Website

How to Cite a Website in APA

Structure:

Last, F. M. (Year, Month Date Published). Article title. Retrieved from URL

Examples:

Satalkar, B. (2010, July 15). Water aerobics. Retrieved from http://www.buzzle.com

Cain, K. (2012, June 29). The Negative effects of Facebook on communication.Social Media Today RSS. Retrieved from http://socialmediatoday.com

From EasyBib: How to cite a website in APA: http://www.easybib.com/reference/guide/apa/website

 

Online Periodical (Including Articles Accessed from Library Databases)

Article From an Online Periodical (Journal, Magazine)

Online articles follow the same guidelines for printed articles. Include all information the online host makes available, including an issue number in parentheses.

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of publication). Title of article. Title of Online Periodical, volume number (issue number if available). Retrieved from 
http://www.someaddress.com/full/url/

Bernstein, M. (2002). 10 tips on writing the living Web. A List Apart: For People Who Make Websites, 149. Retrieved from http://www.alistapart.com/articles/writeliving

From Purdue OWL's APA Formatting: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/10/

Citing a Database Article

MLA citations are provided for articles you access through databases (such as EBSCO or US History in Context.)  Click the "Cite" tool located at the top of the page or on the right-hand side of the article summary page in the database:

How do you cite a source that you found in another source?

Use secondary sources sparingly, for instance, when the original work is out of print, unavailable through usual sources, or not available in English. Give the secondary source in the reference list; in text, name the original work and give a citation for the secondary source.

For example, if Allport's work is cited in Nicholson and you did not read Allport's work, list the Nicholson reference in the reference list. In the text, use the following citation:

Allport's diary (as cited in Nicholson, 2003).

Citing a Website (APA)

Use a citation machine such as Bibme.org to create your APA citation for a website.  Simply select the "Website" tab on the top of the Bibme.org screen, and paste the source website's URL into the search field and click "Find Website."  Add any missing information into the form and click "Add to my Bibliography."

Click the icon below to access Bibme.org:

Citing a Website

Use a citation machine such as EasyBib to create your MLA citation for a website.  Simply copy the website's URL from the address bar at the top of the page and paste it into the search field on EasyBib.  Click the "Cite it" button and follow the on-screen directions.

Click the icon below to access EasyBib: