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BHS_SOCIAL STUDIES 10 HISTORY DAY PROJECT: 3. Locate and Access Information - Using Databases

WHAT ARE PRIMARY SOURCES?

IN A NUTSHELL: Primary sources are the raw materials of history — original documents and objects which were created at the time under study. They are different from secondary sources, accounts or interpretations of events created by someone without firsthand experience.

What Is a Database?

DATABASES are collections of digital resources centered around a broad subject, such as science or health or history. DATABASES are put together by educated individuals (editorial boards) who gather resources from credible sources.

 DATABASES are provided to assist you when completing research and can be accessed at www.anoka.k12.mn.us/eresources. In order to access a database from home, you will need to use the following:

How to search DATABASES:

1. Click on the DATABASE that you would like to explore. When using DATABASES from home, you will be asked for a username and password. Passwords are found on the green EResources card available at the LMC desk.

2. Type in your search term. Try several search terms if the one you use doesn't yield good results.

3. Note that DATABASES include various types of PRIMARY and SECONDARY resources including: academic journals, newspapers, photographs, radio transcripts, video clips, reference books, etc. 

4. Read the title and description of the displayed resources. When you find a resource that you think might be useful to you, click on the title to get the full text. 

Besides containing credible resources, DATABASES also offer the advantage of providing you with a source citation for the resource. These can generally be found at the end of the article or by clicking a "source citation" button. Be sure to copy and paste all of your source citations into a works cited page as you go.

Note also that many DATABASES have a "listen" button that you can click on to have the resource read aloud to you. (Please check out headphones at the desk if you choose this option while using the databases in the LMC.)

There is also generally an e-mail button that allows you to e-mail a resource home to yourself if you think you might not be able to finish reading it during class time and want to have access to it at a later time.

Gale RESEARCH in CONTEXT Collection

Gale: RESEARCH IN CONTEXT Collection covers history,literature, science, and social studies. Primary documents, plays, poems, multimedia including video and audio clips, flags, maps, seals, photography, topic overview, biographies, plot summaries, literary criticism, study guide questions are included. 

(Search this database using broad search terms such as “sixties decade” or “1960's (decade)” or “60's (decade).” You can also search more specifically for a specific subject area like "music of the sixties," or even more specifically for a specific person or event such as "the Beatles" or "John Lennon." Note the list on the right-hand side of types of resources available on your topic. Your best choice will probably be those resources found under “reference." Citations for material from this database can be found at the bottom of the article. Be sure to click on the APA style button. Note that you should include the URL - web address - which is given after the citation.) 

Gale U.S. History in Context

Gale: US History in Context includes primary sources on the most-studied events and issues. Full-text periodcals and reference works.primary documents, and scholarly analysis are also included. Video and audio from NBC, NPR. Viewppoint essays. Image gallery including seals, maps, and flags.

(Search this database using broad search terms such as “sixties” or “1960's” or “60's.” You can also search more specifically for a specific subject area like "music of the sixties," or even more specifically for a specific person or event such as "the Beatles" or "John Lennon." Note the list on the right-hand side of types of resources available on your topic. Your best choice will probably be those resources found under “reference." Citations for material from this database can be found at the bottom of the article. Be sure to click on the APA style button. Note that you should include the URL - web address - which is given after the citation.) 

Gale World History in Context

Gale: World History in Context includes full-text periodicals, reference works, and primary documents. Includes Macmillian Reference USA, Journal of World History, History Review, the Historian, maps, atlases, video and audio from archival NPR. Can search US History in Context within the database. 

(Search this database using broad search terms such as “sixties” or “1960's” or “60's.” You can also search more specifically for a specific subject area like "music of the sixties," or even more specifically for a specific person or event such as "the Beatles" or "John Lennon." Note the list on the right-hand side of types of resources available on your topic. Your best choice will probably be those resources found under “reference." Citations for material from this database can be found at the bottom of the article. Be sure to click on the APA style button. Note that you should include the URL - web address - which is given after the citation.) 

ELM Resources

History Day

Use these databases to find resources for History Day research.